Local Trainings

Local workshop in Berlin

February 22
2024

Local workshop in Potenza

February 24
2024

Local workshop in Paris

APRIL
24
2024

Training Modules

  • Translating Art

    Learning objectives

    using creative and social resources, enlarging audiences, communicating for social engagment

  • Spontaneous museums

    Learning objectives

    Learning innovative and playful communication tools, spreading the culture of valuing things and ideas, self-knowledge, analytical thinking, identifying opportunities.

  • RE – DO

    Learning objectives

    connection between product value and product price, co-creation and co-design, gathering new materials to renew ones’ work, intercepting new clients and collaborations such as cooperatives and schools

  • Hybrid Design

    Learning objectives

    understanding clients needs, presenting one’s products and connecting them to potential clients (i.e.  Museums, Galleries…), co-creation, creative processes

  • Unlocking the Value: Assessing the Worth of Your Object

    Learning objectives

    Aquiring skills in estimating products’ value and price and learing how to communicate about them

  • Artsits’ sdiagramms 

    Learning objectives

    Intruoducing oneself in a comlpex and playful way; reflecting on time management; organising activities by using visual creativity and tools.

  • Mapping opportunities card game

    Learning objectives

    Gain knowkedge about local and international opportunities and learn stategies to diverisfy progessional activities.

  • If I were an archeologist

    Learning objectives

    Exploring the concept of circularity by inventing new functions and giving new meanings to objects, learning about highlighting your engagement for your environnement when you communicate about your artworks.

  • Visual Process Coaching

    Learning objectives

    Participants obtain a tool to use for getting an overall picture of their activities. The activity enables them to have a critical view on the organisaiton of their work, and to improve their activity plans and time management.

  • The mission of upcycling – from understanding to statement

    Learning objectives

    Particpants will learn how to get deeper into the topic/environmental and social issues that they want to touch upon through their work. They learn how to analyse the roots of the problems and based on this, how to express in a clear and original way the mission of their art.

  • Discover your clients

    Learning objectives
    • mapping the clients and stakeholders who are in relation to the participants and their work
    • understanding the clients’ needs and opportunities by the reflecting on their personality and every day lives
    • improving the visibility of the participants’ work and their opportunities to widen the circle of their clients and/or followers
  • Design Thinking/Empathy Mapping

    Learning objectives

    Particpants learn to map the needs of their clients or target groups by dialoguing with them, and to use the results of this activity in their work.

  • Translating Art

    Learning objectives

    using creative and social resources, enlarging audiences, communicating for social engagment

    Skills and Competencies

    Basic manual writing skills (in any language), curiosity, simplification abilities

    Expected results/outcomes

    Participants in this program will learn the following:
    – experimenting with innovative communication tools, such as creating new alphabets or languages, to effectively convey messages.
    – playful and engaging methods for creative expression, which will foster curiosity and inspiration.
    – to develop flexibility in their approach to problem-solving and creative processes, by adapting to different cultural and linguistic contexts.
    – to involve communities in the creative process and explore diverse languages and alphabets to gain insights into how to reinvent their work practices and foster innovation through collaboration.

    Minimum duration

    1 hour

    References, useful websites

    Books on writing and calligraphy, Rodari’s ‘La grammatica della fantasia’ (The Grammar of Fantasy), Gallery of images of various alphabets from the world

    References, useful websites

    , , , ,

    Type of Goal

    COMM (Engaging and understading communities – communication), INCL (Cultural and Social Incusion)

    Tips on participants profile

    any person can particitpate, the group can also be composed by people with different cultural background

    Space and accessibility

    This activity can take place at home or in a workshop room. It can also be conducted outdoors, utilizing natural ‘signs’

    Trainer preparation needs

    Understanding the participants’ artistic and visual skills and providing example images if participants lack competence in artistic composition or visual communication.

    Tools, materials and handouts needed

    Computer, projector, large wall paper, black pens and markers, white or colored sheets, tracing paper, fine brushes, watercolors and paints, alphabets.

    Type of Goal
    COMM (Engaging and understading communities – communication), INCL (Cultural and Social Incusion)
    Learning objectives

    using creative and social resources, enlarging audiences, communicating for social engagment

    Expected results/outcomes

    Participants in this program will learn the following:
    – experimenting with innovative communication tools, such as creating new alphabets or languages, to effectively convey messages.
    – playful and engaging methods for creative expression, which will foster curiosity and inspiration.
    – to develop flexibility in their approach to problem-solving and creative processes, by adapting to different cultural and linguistic contexts.
    – to involve communities in the creative process and explore diverse languages and alphabets to gain insights into how to reinvent their work practices and foster innovation through collaboration.

    Trainer preparation needs

    Understanding the participants’ artistic and visual skills and providing example images if participants lack competence in artistic composition or visual communication.

    Tips and Recommendations

    It can be helpful to map out the different languages spoken in your area and choose alphabets that participants are familiar with. This approach can help people feel more connected to their work and more willing to share their knowledge. By creating a sense of familiarity, you can encourage greater collaboration and engagement among participants.

    Step by step
    • Step 1: Opening Reflection – Start the session by asking the participants the following question: “How many alphabets do you know?” Encourage the participants to analyze the graphic and symbolic characteristics of each alphabet and reflect on how writings always originate from an image and then evolve over time into more abstract symbols. Encourage participants to use storytelling, especially if there are participants from diverse cultural backgrounds.
    • Step 2: Finding Shapes:
      – Distribute squared sheets with a size of your palm and some materials for inspiration such as objects or images cut from magazines among the participants.
      – Ask participants to find shapes in the pictures or by walking around the room.
      – Participants should trace the shapes with a black marker on the squared sheets. Encourage them to capture the essence of the forms and use stylized lines.
      – At the end of this step, everyone will have a catalog of symbols. Lay them all out on the table and invite participants to observe them collectively.
    • Step 3: Composing a New Imaginary Alphabet – Ask participants to use the “catalog of symbols” to create a new imaginary alphabet by unifying the symbols to appear as one language. Encourage the participants to observe the different shapes and modify them to achieve a formal coherence, which is fundamental for creating any collection of products or art.
    • Step 4: Systematizing the Letters – Invite participants to transcribe the letters onto a single sheet using a tool of their choice: pen, marker, brush, etc.
    • Step 5: Writing in the New Alphabet – Participants can be invited to write something in the new alphabet, such as a message, a letter, or a slogan, and decorate the sheet with colors.
    • Step 6: Sharing Alphabets with the Group – Each person presents their alphabet, describing its characteristics and influences. If time permits, a simulation game can be activated in pairs, pretending to be archaeologists who have found an ancient artifact and telling others about the discovery, imagining its history and ancient use of this language.
    Gallery
    References, useful websites

    Books on writing and calligraphy, Rodari’s ‘La grammatica della fantasia’ (The Grammar of Fantasy), Gallery of images of various alphabets from the world

    Duration
    1 hour
    min.
    Skills and Competencies
    Basic manual writing skills (in any language), curiosity, simplification abilities
    Tools

    Computer, projector, large wall paper, black pens and markers, white or colored sheets, tracing paper, fine brushes, watercolors and paints, alphabets.

    Space and accessibility

    This activity can take place at home or in a workshop room. It can also be conducted outdoors, utilizing natural ‘signs’

    Participant profile

    any person can particitpate, the group can also be composed by people with different cultural background

    Category
    ,
    Keywords
    , , , ,
  • Spontaneous museums

    Learning objectives

    Learning innovative and playful communication tools, spreading the culture of valuing things and ideas, self-knowledge, analytical thinking, identifying opportunities.

    Skills and Competencies

    Capacity to share knowledges with others, to open debates, to play

    Expected results/outcomes

    -Improved understanding of the functioning of the art market
    -Learning new creative tools to map local and online stakeholders
    -Refining public relations skills
    -Gaining proficiency in narrating one’s work
    -Enhancing observational skills
    -Conveying messages effectively while describing one’s work.

    Minimum duration

    1 hour

    References, useful websites

    M.E.M.O.Ri project by La luna al guinzaglio – https://www.lalunaalguinzaglio.it/memori/

    References, useful websites

    , , , , ,

    Type of Goal

    COMM (Engaging and understading communities – communication), INCL (Cultural and Social Incusion)

    Tips on participants profile

    Any individual can participate, including a mixed audience of both adults and children. Participants of all ages and diverse backgrounds are welcome. The activity is also recommended for mixed groups that may have difficulty expressing themselves due to language differences or verbal skills variances.

    Space and accessibility

    This activity can be conducted in a workshop room. Optionally, a quicker outdoor version can be carried out anywhere, in an urban or natural setting.

    Trainer preparation needs

    Mapping the city or region of the workshop to find museums with unusual collections

    Tools, materials and handouts needed

    Materials: large sheets or several sheets to put together on a table as large as 2 posters at least; A4 paper, pens, black markers and colored markers, smartphone with web connection, frames, pens, paper for captions.

    Type of Goal
    COMM (Engaging and understading communities – communication), INCL (Cultural and Social Incusion)
    Learning objectives

    Learning innovative and playful communication tools, spreading the culture of valuing things and ideas, self-knowledge, analytical thinking, identifying opportunities.

    Expected results/outcomes

    -Improved understanding of the functioning of the art market
    -Learning new creative tools to map local and online stakeholders
    -Refining public relations skills
    -Gaining proficiency in narrating one’s work
    -Enhancing observational skills
    -Conveying messages effectively while describing one’s work.

    Trainer preparation needs

    Mapping the city or region of the workshop to find museums with unusual collections

    Tips and Recommendations

    The workshop facilitator can explore various unusual museums dedicated to unexpected objects and distinguish between an exhibition and a collection. The workshop can also be conducted outdoors, where participants can create an OSM (Outdoor Spontaneous Museum) by framing intriguing details of the environment using a small wooden frame and sheets of paper. This creative adventure allows participants to turn ordinary scenes into extraordinary “green” exhibits using natural elements or urban details that catch the eye. The steps involved are simple: A) Look around, B) Take a frame, C) Give a name to the detail you framed, D) Write a caption, and E) Open your exhibition to others.

    Step by step
    • Step 1. Introduction and Set-up:
      – Begin by explaining the objectives of the workshop. The aim is to use the museum as a metaphor for creating a community and understanding the importance of connections in creating a collection of product categories, works, audiences, and stakeholders.
      – Ask participants to select one photograph from their smartphone and convert the photo to black and white to maintain color consistency.
    • Step 2. Creative connection: Ask participants to place their smartphones with the selected photo on the white sheet of paper and connect lines between the images with a black marker.
    • Step 3. Observation and discussion: Invite participants to observe the results and open a debate about what it seems like, what it could be, how it could be described, and how participants felt during the activity. Encourage them to reflect on how their creation can be turned into a collection.
    • Step 4. Building a Collection: Invite each participant to choose 4 images from their own phone, find a common narrative thread among them and invent a micro-collection. They will imagine a title for each image, write a caption for each, and present them to the others as if it were a museum exhibition.
    Gallery
    References, useful websites

    M.E.M.O.Ri project by La luna al guinzaglio – https://www.lalunaalguinzaglio.it/memori/

    Duration
    1 hour
    min.
    Skills and Competencies
    Capacity to share knowledges with others, to open debates, to play
    Tools

    Materials: large sheets or several sheets to put together on a table as large as 2 posters at least; A4 paper, pens, black markers and colored markers, smartphone with web connection, frames, pens, paper for captions.

    Space and accessibility

    This activity can be conducted in a workshop room. Optionally, a quicker outdoor version can be carried out anywhere, in an urban or natural setting.

    Participant profile

    Any individual can participate, including a mixed audience of both adults and children. Participants of all ages and diverse backgrounds are welcome. The activity is also recommended for mixed groups that may have difficulty expressing themselves due to language differences or verbal skills variances.

    Category
    ,
    Keywords
    , , , , ,
  • RE – DO

    Learning objectives

    connection between product value and product price, co-creation and co-design, gathering new materials to renew ones’ work, intercepting new clients and collaborations such as cooperatives and schools

    Skills and Competencies

    Writing skills (in any language), curiosity, simplification abilities, analytical skills.

    Expected results/outcomes

    Increased awareness about waste production and its creative potential.
    Enhanced collaboration between artists, enterprises, or schools.
    Finding innovative solutions involving art and didactics.
    Empowering sustainable practices in artworking.
    Exploring new possibilities beyond traditional artistic creation.
    Incorporating elements of gamification into their creative processes.
    Spreading a more socially and ecologically conscious message into one’s creative process.

    Minimum duration

    1 hour

    References, useful websites

    Loose Parts Theory in didactics and creative processes:
    [Community Playthings – Loose Parts] (https://www.communityplaythings.com/resources/articles/2018/loose-parts)
    [Inspired EC – Loose Parts Play] (https://www.inspiredec.com/blogs/inspired-ec-blog/what-are-loose-parts)
    [Natural Learning – Loose Parts Theory] (https://www.naturallearning.org/loose-parts)
    [The Play and Learning Environment – Loose Parts] (https://www.playlearningenvironment.org/loose-parts)
    [The Art of Education University – Loose Parts in the Art Room] (https://theartofeducation.edu/2019/02/27/loose-parts-in-the-art-room/)

    References, useful websites

    , , , , , ,

    Type of Goal

    ENV (Environmental)

    Tips on participants profile

    Any person can participate; the audience can also be mixed, with different abilities and skills.

    Space and accessibility

    This activity can be done either at home, in a workshop room, or even outdoors if natural elements are collected beforehand. Another option is to ask participants to bring various scrap materials from home, like bottle caps or buttons.

    Trainer preparation needs

    The facilitator can research the nature of unstructured materials and the pedagogy of “loose parts” and open-ended materials.

    Tools, materials and handouts needed

    Loose parts or unstructured materials can be either natural or manufactured. These materials are everyday objects that can be manipulated and used in many different ways. They can be moved, carried, shared, combined, and taken apart in various configurations and designs. Loose parts are also known as “open-ended materials”. Some examples of loose parts include buttons, pebbles, wood scraps, bottle caps, shells, ribbons, and so on. It is important to provide a large quantity of each material to encourage creativity and exploration.

    Type of Goal
    ENV (Environmental)
    Learning objectives

    connection between product value and product price, co-creation and co-design, gathering new materials to renew ones’ work, intercepting new clients and collaborations such as cooperatives and schools

    Expected results/outcomes

    Increased awareness about waste production and its creative potential.
    Enhanced collaboration between artists, enterprises, or schools.
    Finding innovative solutions involving art and didactics.
    Empowering sustainable practices in artworking.
    Exploring new possibilities beyond traditional artistic creation.
    Incorporating elements of gamification into their creative processes.
    Spreading a more socially and ecologically conscious message into one’s creative process.

    Trainer preparation needs

    The facilitator can research the nature of unstructured materials and the pedagogy of “loose parts” and open-ended materials.

    Tips and Recommendations

    Waste production mapping, enterprises and social stakeholders identification, identifying potential clients working with art and didactics interested in environmental issues

    Step by step
    • Step 1: Introduction and Scenario – Explain the scenario and purpose of the role-play workshop, which is to create one or more game proposals for a school or cooperative using only serially produced objects.
    • Step 2: Material Exploration and Group Setting – Divide participants into pairs and provide each pair with a specific number of serially recovered materials. For instance, one group may work on buttons, another group on pieces of fabric, and one on pieces of wood. Allow the groups enough time to explore the physical characteristics of the materials, such as plasticity, transparency, hardness, and flexibility, focusing on sensory aspects. Based on this initial analysis, participants can form an idea of the target audience to whom the proposals can be offered.
    • Step 3: Proposal Creation and Activity Sheet – Give each group 30 minutes to create either a game with functioning rules or two activity proposals using the materials provided. Provide them with an activity sheet to describe the different elements of the activities, such as target audience, age, objectives, and so on. Emphasize to participants that they must not permanently modify or assemble the materials during the activities. The materials need to be “loosened” after use and returned to their initial state to be useful for another play.
    • Step 4: Plenary Sharing and Open Discussion – Have each group share their proposals with the rest of the participants, followed by a debate on the playability of each proposal.
    • Step 5: Collective Reflection and Comparisons – Open a collective reflection on the differences between an assembled work and a kit. Ask participants if anyone has ever played with an artistic kit. Compile the pros and cons of the two creative processes – Assembly vs. Loose Parts Kit – on a large sheet.
    Gallery
    References, useful websites

    Loose Parts Theory in didactics and creative processes:
    [Community Playthings – Loose Parts] (https://www.communityplaythings.com/resources/articles/2018/loose-parts)
    [Inspired EC – Loose Parts Play] (https://www.inspiredec.com/blogs/inspired-ec-blog/what-are-loose-parts)
    [Natural Learning – Loose Parts Theory] (https://www.naturallearning.org/loose-parts)
    [The Play and Learning Environment – Loose Parts] (https://www.playlearningenvironment.org/loose-parts)
    [The Art of Education University – Loose Parts in the Art Room] (https://theartofeducation.edu/2019/02/27/loose-parts-in-the-art-room/)

    Duration
    1 hour
    min.
    Skills and Competencies
    Writing skills (in any language), curiosity, simplification abilities, analytical skills.
    Tools

    Loose parts or unstructured materials can be either natural or manufactured. These materials are everyday objects that can be manipulated and used in many different ways. They can be moved, carried, shared, combined, and taken apart in various configurations and designs. Loose parts are also known as “open-ended materials”. Some examples of loose parts include buttons, pebbles, wood scraps, bottle caps, shells, ribbons, and so on. It is important to provide a large quantity of each material to encourage creativity and exploration.

    Space and accessibility

    This activity can be done either at home, in a workshop room, or even outdoors if natural elements are collected beforehand. Another option is to ask participants to bring various scrap materials from home, like bottle caps or buttons.

    Participant profile

    Any person can participate; the audience can also be mixed, with different abilities and skills.

    Category
    ,
    Keywords
    , , , , , ,
  • Hybrid Design

    Learning objectives

    understanding clients needs, presenting one’s products and connecting them to potential clients (i.e.  Museums, Galleries…), co-creation, creative processes

    Skills and Competencies

    Basic composition skills, rudimentary writing abilities, willingness to think outside the box, openness to unconventional ideas, ability to embrace limitations, readiness to work within constraints, ability to use scissors effectively

    Expected results/outcomes

    – Reinventing work practices and approaches through alternative communication and expression methods
    – Using unconventional communication tools such as collages to convey messages effectively
    – Learning playful and engaging methods of artistic expression to foster creativity and innovation
    – Developing flexibility in problem-solving and creative expression, by adapting to new challenges and constraints
    – Encouraging collaboration and teamwork, allowing participants to work together in creative groups to achieve a shared vision.

    Minimum duration

    1 hour

    References, useful websites

    Books of different Museums, Image galleries

    References, useful websites

    , , , ,

    Type of Goal

    COMM (Engaging and understading communities – communication)

    Tips on participants profile

    any person can participate

    Space and accessibility

    This activity can take place at home or in a workshop environment. It can also be organized as an online session by obtaining the materials beforehand.

    Trainer preparation needs

    The trainer needs to have an understanding of the participants’ artistic and visual skills and provide example images if participants lack competence in artistic composition or visual communication.

    Tools, materials and handouts needed

    Computer, projector, selection of printed images from a Museum collection, newspapers, catalogues, artbooks, glue, scissors, pens, white or black paper sheets, colored paper scraps

    Type of Goal
    COMM (Engaging and understading communities – communication)
    Learning objectives

    understanding clients needs, presenting one’s products and connecting them to potential clients (i.e.  Museums, Galleries…), co-creation, creative processes

    Expected results/outcomes

    – Reinventing work practices and approaches through alternative communication and expression methods
    – Using unconventional communication tools such as collages to convey messages effectively
    – Learning playful and engaging methods of artistic expression to foster creativity and innovation
    – Developing flexibility in problem-solving and creative expression, by adapting to new challenges and constraints
    – Encouraging collaboration and teamwork, allowing participants to work together in creative groups to achieve a shared vision.

    Trainer preparation needs

    The trainer needs to have an understanding of the participants’ artistic and visual skills and provide example images if participants lack competence in artistic composition or visual communication.

    Tips and Recommendations

    It is recommended to engage participants to mapping museums and galleries in their area and using images from their collections.

    Step by step
    • Step 1: Setting the Scene
      – Explain to the workshop participants the aim of the workshop: They are asked to create for the Archaeological Museum of an imaginary city a new set of promotional postcards.
      – Create groups of 2 or 3 people, preferably with participants who share similar backgrounds or interests.
      – Provide each group with a pre-selected kit of materials, including a printed image of a museum piece, a text containing the caption of the artwork, two magazines to flip through, and torn pieces of colored paper.
    • Step 2: Individual Selection of Images
      – Invite participants to individually flip through the magazines and select images.
      – Guide them to choose pictures that strike them without evaluating aesthetics, and that have a well-defined outline for easy cutting.
      – Participants should avoid selecting landscapes and indefinite figures, and prefer recognizable people, animals, objects, or parts of them.
      – Each participant should choose 3 or 4 figures.
    • Step 3: Cutting Out Images
      – Invite participants to cut out the selected images.
      – Encourage them to cut as precisely as possible to achieve an effective and polished final visual effect.
    • Step 4: Group Collaboration
      – Invite groups to create a “surreal” image by juxtaposing the museum artwork with the cut-out figures to create a collage.
      – Encourage groups to follow a storytelling process based on the message the image wants to visually communicate and its connection with the museum.
      – Ask questions such as: What could be told about the museum? Put yourself in the Director’s shoes; what would he want to be told about his museum?
      – Provide a sentence to complete, such as: “The museum is…”
      – Each group can then choose and cut out a word from the magazine that makes sense to complete the sentence and connect it with the image, creating a slogan for the museum.
    • Step 5: Guided Composition
      – Guide participants in the final composition of the collages, adding torn pieces of colored paper, the caption of the artwork, and other visual elements.
    • Step 6: Plenary Sharing
      – Share the gallery of images and slogans in a plenary session.
    Gallery
    References, useful websites

    Books of different Museums, Image galleries

    Duration
    1 hour
    min.
    Skills and Competencies
    Basic composition skills, rudimentary writing abilities, willingness to think outside the box, openness to unconventional ideas, ability to embrace limitations, readiness to work within constraints, ability to use scissors effectively
    Tools

    Computer, projector, selection of printed images from a Museum collection, newspapers, catalogues, artbooks, glue, scissors, pens, white or black paper sheets, colored paper scraps

    Space and accessibility

    This activity can take place at home or in a workshop environment. It can also be organized as an online session by obtaining the materials beforehand.

    Participant profile

    any person can participate

    Category
    ,
    Keywords
    , , , ,
  • Unlocking the Value: Assessing the Worth of Your Object

    Learning objectives

    Aquiring skills in estimating products’ value and price and learing how to communicate about them

    Skills and Competencies

    analytical skills, communication and storytelling skills

    Expected results/outcomes

    Having a clearer and more exaustive list of criteria to define the value of an object, gaining skills in desribing the “real” value of an object and have feedbacks, improve communication skills in product descritption

    Minimum duration

    60 minutes

    References, useful websites

    References, useful websites

    , ,

    Type of Goal

    ENV (Environmental), COMM (Engaging and understading communities – communication), INCL (Cultural and Social Incusion)

    Tips on participants profile

    The practice is ideal for any person, designed for creative people selling or willing to sell their handmade products

    Space and accessibility

    A room to host the participants, chairs and a large table to sit around

    Trainer preparation needs

    Download and print the tables with the list of “Criteria of value”

    EU COM value sheet .pdf

    Tools, materials and handouts needed

    Handouts: “Criteria of value”, whiteboard and markers

  • Artsits’ sdiagramms 

    Learning objectives

    Intruoducing oneself in a comlpex and playful way; reflecting on time management; organising activities by using visual creativity and tools.

    Skills and Competencies

    Organisation and time management skills, communication skills, visual creation skills.

    Expected results/outcomes

    Participants will be taught about effective time management techniques and methods to analyze their daily tasks. This will help them become more efficient in organizing their work, and reduce stress while finding more enjoyment in their work. The participants will also be prepared for co-creation by learning about each other and sharing their own everyday experiences and challenges.

    Minimum duration

    30 minutes

    References, useful websites

    Examples for artists’ diagrams and their uses to create objects/artworks: https://cotaassociation.wixsite.com/learing/digramming-art-for-time-management

    References, useful websites

    , , ,

    Type of Goal

    COMM (Engaging and understading communities – communication)

    Tips on participants profile

    The practice is mainly designed for people enagged in multiple creative activities. It can be used by anyone who is willing to express themselves through visual creation.

    Space and accessibility

    A room to host the participants, chairs and a large table to sit around

    Trainer preparation needs

    Trainers can try out the activity beforehand and show their diagrams to the participants.

    Tools, materials and handouts needed

    Examples of artists’ diagrams presented by the facilitator, aquarell or drawing paper, pencils, colorful crayons, rulers, markers, ereasers, eventually combass, aquarell paint and stencils

    Type of Goal
    COMM (Engaging and understading communities – communication)
    Learning objectives

    Intruoducing oneself in a comlpex and playful way; reflecting on time management; organising activities by using visual creativity and tools.

    Expected results/outcomes

    Participants will be taught about effective time management techniques and methods to analyze their daily tasks. This will help them become more efficient in organizing their work, and reduce stress while finding more enjoyment in their work. The participants will also be prepared for co-creation by learning about each other and sharing their own everyday experiences and challenges.

    Trainer preparation needs

    Trainers can try out the activity beforehand and show their diagrams to the participants.

    Tips and Recommendations

    This activity is versatile and can be used to break the ice, build a sense of community, or facilitate co-creative activities. Participants can dive deeper into the activity by exploring their diagrams and co-designing a diagram that represents their ideal day. Additionally, this activity can be used to introduce a creative workshop where participants brainstorm ways to repurpose their diagrams, such as using them as decoration or transferring them to other objects or paintings.

    Step by step
    • Step 1: Introduction and presentations. Guide the participants to introduce themselves and encourage them to reflect on their time management and how creativity can help them.
    • Step 2: Participants draw their diagrams according to the option they selected. There are three options:
      – Option A: The energy line diagram shows the changes in one’s energy throughout the day. It can take the shape of a wave, where the wave goes up to represent high energy levels and down to represent low energy levels. The horizontal line represents the hours of the day. The participants observe the shape of their diagram and draw patterns, symbols, or points on the wave to show the activities they are doing at specific moments of the day.
      – Option B: Circle of the day. Participants draw a circle and slice it to place their different activities in it. More space can be left for things that take more time and importance, and less space for things that are less important. Each activity can be represented by colors, ornaments, or small drawings.
      – Option C: The diagram of everyday activities represents calmness and excitement. Participants draw symbols of their everyday activities alongside the horizontal line. Then, they put two points above them to represent the level of excitement and calmness they feel when doing the activity.
    • Step 3: Each participant describes their day using their diagram.
    • Step 4: Evaluation and discussion. Ask participants for their feedback on the exercise. Is it a thinking tool or a creative tool? Can they use these diagrams elsewhere in their creations? What did they learn about each other? Did they discover similarities between their own and the other participants’ diagrams?
    Gallery
    References, useful websites

    Examples for artists’ diagrams and their uses to create objects/artworks: https://cotaassociation.wixsite.com/learing/digramming-art-for-time-management

    Duration
    30 minutes
    min.
    Skills and Competencies
    Organisation and time management skills, communication skills, visual creation skills.
    Tools

    Examples of artists’ diagrams presented by the facilitator, aquarell or drawing paper, pencils, colorful crayons, rulers, markers, ereasers, eventually combass, aquarell paint and stencils

    Space and accessibility

    A room to host the participants, chairs and a large table to sit around

    Participant profile

    The practice is mainly designed for people enagged in multiple creative activities. It can be used by anyone who is willing to express themselves through visual creation.

    Category
    ,
    Keywords
    , , ,
  • Mapping opportunities card game

    Learning objectives

    Gain knowkedge about local and international opportunities and learn stategies to diverisfy progessional activities.

    Skills and Competencies

    Analytical skills, project design and communication

    Expected results/outcomes

    Concretising proposals and discovering new opportunities, diversifing activities based on creative work

    Minimum duration

    45 minutes

    References, useful websites

    References, useful websites

    , ,

    Type of Goal

    COMM (Engaging and understading communities – communication), INCL (Cultural and Social Incusion)

    Tips on participants profile

    The practice is ideal for any person, designed for creative people

    Space and accessibility

    A room to host the participants, chairs and a large table to sit around

    Trainer preparation needs

    Download, print and cut of the cards. Several copies should be printed in case participants need the same cards.
    Asl participants to bring photos of their work.

    Tools, materials and handouts needed

    The card game, notebooks, pens

    Type of Goal
    COMM (Engaging and understading communities – communication), INCL (Cultural and Social Incusion)
    Learning objectives

    Gain knowkedge about local and international opportunities and learn stategies to diverisfy progessional activities.

    Expected results/outcomes

    Concretising proposals and discovering new opportunities, diversifing activities based on creative work

    Trainer preparation needs

    Download, print and cut of the cards. Several copies should be printed in case participants need the same cards.
    Asl participants to bring photos of their work.

    Tips and Recommendations
    Step by step
    • Step 1: Introduction
      Arrange the cards into lines and put them on the table (see illustration Nr. 1). Explain the exercise and the cards to the participants. This exercise can be done alone or in pairs. Each participant should choose a photo of any of their artworks. If they work alone, they can use any object or artwork they have created as a starting point. If they work in pairs, they can use both works as a basis for the exercise.
    • Step 2: Card Game
      The card game can be played in two different ways:
      Option A: Participants choose an artwork and create an activity path by taking one card from each of the following piles:

      • Topic cards: these cards contain topics that can be treated through the art object. They are colored dark green.
      • Institution cards: these cards contain institutions or potential collaborators that might be interested in the topic. They are colored orange.
      • Activity cards: these cards contain activities that fit the interests of the selected institution. They are colored burgundy red.
      • Skill cards: these cards contain skills to be shared or gained through the activity. They are colored dark violet.
      • Objective cards: these cards contain objectives and outcomes of the activity. They are colored turquoise blue.
      • Participants decide on the order of the cards and create a path based on the first card chosen.

      Option B: Participants create a path using the cards, but the first card is chosen accidentally without looking at it. This ensures that participants explore different opportunities. Participants choose the cards in rounds. To decide who goes first, use a dice. You can also allow the pairs to create their own paths, take a photo of it, and put the cards back on the table. You can use the empty cards to add other institutions, gains, skills, and activities.

    • Step 3: Action Plan
      Based on the paths created, each pair or participant will make an “”action plan.”” Some tips to help them are:
      – What will be the content of your activity? How will you set it up?
      – What do you need from the institution/collaborator you have chosen?
      – How will you get in touch with them?
      – In what form will you present your activity proposal (video, text+image presentation, webpage, etc.)?
      – What should your proposal contain?
    • Step 4: Presentation
      Each pair or participant presents their action plan to the group.
    • Step 5: Evaluation and Discussion
      Evaluation and discussion of the activity will take place in a plenary session.”
    Gallery
    References, useful websites
    Duration
    45 minutes
    min.
    Skills and Competencies
    Analytical skills, project design and communication
    Tools

    The card game, notebooks, pens

    Space and accessibility

    A room to host the participants, chairs and a large table to sit around

    Participant profile

    The practice is ideal for any person, designed for creative people

    Category
    ,
    Keywords
    , ,
  • If I were an archeologist

    Learning objectives

    Exploring the concept of circularity by inventing new functions and giving new meanings to objects, learning about highlighting your engagement for your environnement when you communicate about your artworks.

    Skills and Competencies

    Improve observation, analytical, digital and communication skills

    Expected results/outcomes

    Participants gain skills in storytelling, design thinking, designing upcycled objects and communicate about them.

    Minimum duration

    45 minutes

    References, useful websites

    To illustate how to put in practice the activities results: https://cotaassociation.wixsite.com/learing/recycling-stories

    References, useful websites

    , , , , ,

    Type of Goal

    ENV (Environmental), COMM (Engaging and understading communities – communication)

    Tips on participants profile

    The practice is ideal for any person having or willing to launch upcycling creative activities.

    Space and accessibility

    A room to host the participants, chairs and a large table to sit around

    Trainer preparation needs

    Collect everyday objects such as pieces of furniture, wood or any other waste material, old electronic devices, office equipment items, household waste such as plastic bottles or organic waste such as leaves, branches, etc.
    Ask each particiant to bring one object with them to the workshop. Prepare a template handout with guiding questions for the analysis of the objects.

    Tools, materials and handouts needed

    Papers or notebooks, pens to note, a wide range of everyday objects collected from home or from a workshop (See examples in illustrations)

    Type of Goal
    ENV (Environmental), COMM (Engaging and understading communities – communication)
    Learning objectives

    Exploring the concept of circularity by inventing new functions and giving new meanings to objects, learning about highlighting your engagement for your environnement when you communicate about your artworks.

    Expected results/outcomes

    Participants gain skills in storytelling, design thinking, designing upcycled objects and communicate about them.

    Trainer preparation needs

    Collect everyday objects such as pieces of furniture, wood or any other waste material, old electronic devices, office equipment items, household waste such as plastic bottles or organic waste such as leaves, branches, etc.
    Ask each particiant to bring one object with them to the workshop. Prepare a template handout with guiding questions for the analysis of the objects.

    Tips and Recommendations

    This activity can be used to improve skills in design thinking and upcycling objects, either as an independent exercise or as an introductory activity to a creative workshop where the objects will be transformed into something else. You can find examples at https://cotaassociation.wixsite.com/learing/recycling-stories

    Step by step
    • Step 1: Introduction
      Arrange the objects on a table and explain the activity to the participants. Tell them they are archaeologists living in the 23rd century, who have discovered precious objects from the 21st century at an archaeological dig. They need to describe these objects scientifically in front of a committee composed of scientists, archaeologists, historians, and curators. Guide the participants to form pairs.
    • Step 2: Scientific Research and Consultation
      Participants work in pairs and discuss the object in detail. They should take notes to answer the following questions:

      • Identify the material, size, shape and weight of the object. Is it new or used? Be as precise as possible.
      • What might have been the object’s function or functions?
      • Are there any specific circumstances of the object’s use?
      • What does the object tell about its user(s) and owner(s), such as sex, age, economic, cultural, or ethnic background?
      • What does the object tell about the society, the era, or the geographical zone in which it had been used?
      • If the object is a remaining piece of a bigger or more complex object, or if its physical appearance might have been different 200 years ago, imagine how it used to be. Participants can also make drawings for the presentation, imagine legends around it, add humorous or ironic elements, etc.
    • Step 3: Archeologists’ Assembly (Presentation)
      Gather the participants around the table and set up the scene of the ‘Archeologists’ assembly’. Participants form a scientific committee. Provide short guidance to the participant about their presentation, for example, how to be convincing, precise, appealing, etc. Then, participants present their projects one by one to the committee (to each other). The committee members ask questions and at the end assess if the thesis presented seemed plausible or not.
    • Step 4: Evaluation and discussion
      Raise questions for a plenary discussion: Was this exercise useful? Could you use this technique to design new objects and tools in the framework of your creative activity?
    Gallery
    References, useful websites

    To illustate how to put in practice the activities results: https://cotaassociation.wixsite.com/learing/recycling-stories

    Duration
    45 minutes
    min.
    Skills and Competencies
    Improve observation, analytical, digital and communication skills
    Tools

    Papers or notebooks, pens to note, a wide range of everyday objects collected from home or from a workshop (See examples in illustrations)

    Space and accessibility

    A room to host the participants, chairs and a large table to sit around

    Participant profile

    The practice is ideal for any person having or willing to launch upcycling creative activities.

    Category
    ,
    Keywords
    , , , , ,
  • Visual Process Coaching

    Learning objectives

    Participants obtain a tool to use for getting an overall picture of their activities. The activity enables them to have a critical view on the organisaiton of their work, and to improve their activity plans and time management.

    Skills and Competencies

    critical thinking, systemic thinking, time management, planning, codesign

    Expected results/outcomes

    Process pictures designed by the participants; partcipants will be aware of the activities they implement and will be able to better plan their work with the hep of the tool they learn to use.

    Minimum duration

    2 hours

    References, useful websites

    References, useful websites

    , , , , , ,

    Type of Goal

    ENV (Environmental), COMM (Engaging and understading communities – communication), INCL (Cultural and Social Incusion)

    Tips on participants profile

    The excercise is recommended to any type of participants.

    Space and accessibility

    A room providing space for group work

    Trainer preparation needs

    Understanding the “rich picture” method, unerstanding the principles of process coaching, getting aware of the specific skills and needs of the participants

    Tools, materials and handouts needed

    • white paper, stamps, coloured pencils or pens
    • process coaching template
    Type of Goal
    ENV (Environmental), COMM (Engaging and understading communities – communication), INCL (Cultural and Social Incusion)
    Learning objectives

    Participants obtain a tool to use for getting an overall picture of their activities. The activity enables them to have a critical view on the organisaiton of their work, and to improve their activity plans and time management.

    Expected results/outcomes

    Process pictures designed by the participants; partcipants will be aware of the activities they implement and will be able to better plan their work with the hep of the tool they learn to use.

    Trainer preparation needs

    Understanding the “rich picture” method, unerstanding the principles of process coaching, getting aware of the specific skills and needs of the participants

    Tips and Recommendations

    A regular follow-up of the groups’ work is necessary to prevent any potential harm to participants when sensitive questions are asked.

    Step by step

    • Step 4: Presentation and Comparative Discussion
      Invite the groups to present their cases and to discuss differences and similarities in a closing plenary discussion.

      • Step 1: Introductory Discussion
        Introduce the activity and the main principles of process coaching. Launch a discussion about the participants’ work, either in groups or in a plenary session. Participants identify the main activities they engage in during different phases of their work.

      • Step 2: Drawing Your Activities
        Participants draw their activities on a large blank paper according to their main types (e.g. purchase of material, creation, marketing, selling, etc.) and create a symbol, icon or any other illustration for each activity type. This results in a picture with activities, symbols, and more. Participants can draw or create a collage of photos and drawings, and also identify timing, tools, and space needed for each type of activity based on the template provided. They mark their feelings about the activities using like and dislike icons and adding a degree between 1 and 10.

      • Step 3: Process Coaching
        Participants work in pairs or groups of 3. The group work is divided into as many turns as people involved in the group. At each turn, one person plays the role of the “client” and the others the role of the coaches. The process coaches ask the client to select the most liked and disliked activities and analyze them. They can help the client by asking guiding questions such as “what are the easiest and most difficult activities”? “What are your strong and weak sides”? “What needs to be improved and how”?
        By the end of the exercise, the client needs to identify, with the help of the coaches, the main steps to be undertaken for transforming the most disliked activities into liked or at least respected ones, by using the positive elements of the liked activities. The results of the discussion are summarized as a list of To-Dos.

    • Step 4: Presentation and Comparative Discussion
      Invite the groups to present their cases and to discuss differences and similarities in a closing plenary discussion.
    Duration
    2 hours
    min.
    Skills and Competencies
    critical thinking, systemic thinking, time management, planning, codesign
    Tools
    • white paper, stamps, coloured pencils or pens
    • process coaching template
    Space and accessibility

    A room providing space for group work

    Participant profile

    The excercise is recommended to any type of participants.

    Category
    ,
    Keywords
    , , , , , ,
  • The mission of upcycling – from understanding to statement

    Learning objectives

    Particpants will learn how to get deeper into the topic/environmental and social issues that they want to touch upon through their work. They learn how to analyse the roots of the problems and based on this, how to express in a clear and original way the mission of their art.

    Skills and Competencies

    Analytical skills, environmental and social skills, commuciation skills, skills for conceptualisation

    Expected results/outcomes

    • A list of conceptual definitions of the problems tackled by upcycling.
    • Individual stories
    • Problem trees
    • Mission statements
    • participants obtain a skill and tools to better formulate their mission already at the start of their project

    Minimum duration

    2 hours

    References, useful websites

    References, useful websites

    , , ,

    Type of Goal

    ENV (Environmental), COMM (Engaging and understading communities – communication)

    Tips on participants profile

    The excercise is suitable for any type of participants

    Space and accessibility

    • a room with a possibility to work in groups
    • good internet connection

    Trainer preparation needs

    • get acknolweged about the main principles of system thinking and the problem tree excercise
    • understanding the main completences, skills and backgrounds of the particpants
    • finding a good tool for faciitating the plenary discussions (workdcloud, flinga, or offline tools)

    Tools, materials and handouts needed

    • online or offline white board
    • problem tree sample handout
    • paper, pens for drawing
    • wires, small objects for creating a problem tree sculpture
    Type of Goal
    ENV (Environmental), COMM (Engaging and understading communities – communication)
    Learning objectives

    Particpants will learn how to get deeper into the topic/environmental and social issues that they want to touch upon through their work. They learn how to analyse the roots of the problems and based on this, how to express in a clear and original way the mission of their art.

    Expected results/outcomes
    • A list of conceptual definitions of the problems tackled by upcycling.
    • Individual stories
    • Problem trees
    • Mission statements
    • participants obtain a skill and tools to better formulate their mission already at the start of their project
    Trainer preparation needs
    • get acknolweged about the main principles of system thinking and the problem tree excercise
    • understanding the main completences, skills and backgrounds of the particpants
    • finding a good tool for faciitating the plenary discussions (workdcloud, flinga, or offline tools)
    Tips and Recommendations
    • Step 1: if the number of participants is too high this part can also be realised in groups. It can also be combined with Step 2.
    • Step 3: participants can also use pre-prepared problem tree visual template or they can create their own drawing
    • Step 5: mission statement can also individually.
    Step by step

      • Step 1: Plenary Session 
        Launch a discussion about the main issues and problems addressed by upcycling art. Ask participants to write down the main words and concepts that come to their minds. Based on these, launch a common discussion to find consensus. Use an online tool such as word cloud, Flinga, Miro, or offline tools such as a whiteboard and post-its to collect ideas.

      • Step 2: Group Work 
        Create groups of 3-4 people and guide the participants to discuss their personal experiences with upcycling by asking questions such as: Why do you work with upcycling? Why do you find it useful? What is the story of your motivation? Ask participants to provide short personal stories and write or draw them on white paper.

      • Step 3: Problem Tree Drawing 
        Explain the main elements of the Problem Tree practice, and show some examples. Ask each participant to draw their own Problem Tree by using the following questions: 

          • Roots: What are the main social and environmental problems that you identify and think about when you work on upcycling?

          • Trunk: How do you describe upcycling? What are the main values and principles of upcycling that can provide an answer to the original problems?

          • Branches and Leaves: What are the results? What are the main creative paths of upcycling, and what are the concrete outcomes? How will these outcomes resolve the original problem?

      • Step 4: Problem Tree Sculpture 
        Based on the individual trees, ask the participants to work in their groups again and create a Problem Tree sculpture using wires and different objects. While constructing the sculpture, the participants discuss the common elements and differences represented by their Problem Trees. The final Problem Tree sculptures will represent the results of co-creation, co-reflection, and compromise.

      • Step 5: Summary and Formulation of a Common Mission Statement 
        Based on their Common Problem Tree Sculptures, the groups identify a common mission statement by answering the question: What do we want to change when doing upcycling creativity? Optionally, they can co-design a visual element such as a canvas, poster, flyer, or any other type of object.

      • Step 6: Wrap-up Plenary Discussion 
        Launch a discussion about the aims and use of the exercise.

    Duration
    2 hours
    min.
    Skills and Competencies
    Analytical skills, environmental and social skills, commuciation skills, skills for conceptualisation
    Tools
    • online or offline white board
    • problem tree sample handout
    • paper, pens for drawing
    • wires, small objects for creating a problem tree sculpture
    Space and accessibility
    • a room with a possibility to work in groups
    • good internet connection
    Participant profile

    The excercise is suitable for any type of participants

    Category
    ,
    Keywords
    , , ,
  • Discover your clients

    Learning objectives

    • mapping the clients and stakeholders who are in relation to the participants and their work
    • understanding the clients’ needs and opportunities by the reflecting on their personality and every day lives
    • improving the visibility of the participants’ work and their opportunities to widen the circle of their clients and/or followers

    Skills and Competencies

    social and psychologial skills, empathy, imagination, marketing skills, communication skills

    Expected results/outcomes

    By the end of the session, participants will be able to:

    • Complete at least one stakeholder map, one persona template, or a drawing.
    • Use different tools to map their market, clients, and collaborators, and understand their personalities.
    • Understand the importance of completing this activity for any kind of art project.
    • Recognize the significance of understanding their clients, targets, and partners to ensure success.

    Minimum duration

    1,5 hours

    References, useful websites

    References, useful websites

    , , , , ,

    Type of Goal

    COMM (Engaging and understading communities – communication), INCL (Cultural and Social Incusion)

    Tips on participants profile

    Mapping clients and stakeholders needs to be realised according to participant orientation: market-oriented artists focus on expanding their market by understanding their clientele; non-profit artists emphasize stakeholder mapping and understanding project target groups.

    Space and accessibility

    • The activity can be organised in any training spaces. A blank wall or canvas is needed to put the results on.
    • In case of Online course: a MIRO board needs to be open where people can put the results of their work.

    Trainer preparation needs

    • understanding the participants’ profiles and preparing the activity accordingly
    • preparation of handouts – either by using the proosed ones or creating new ones

    Tools, materials and handouts needed

    • Stakholder map template
    • persona template
    • blank paper, pens and pecils available in the room
    Type of Goal
    COMM (Engaging and understading communities – communication), INCL (Cultural and Social Incusion)
    Learning objectives
    • mapping the clients and stakeholders who are in relation to the participants and their work
    • understanding the clients’ needs and opportunities by the reflecting on their personality and every day lives
    • improving the visibility of the participants’ work and their opportunities to widen the circle of their clients and/or followers
    Expected results/outcomes

    By the end of the session, participants will be able to:

    • Complete at least one stakeholder map, one persona template, or a drawing.
    • Use different tools to map their market, clients, and collaborators, and understand their personalities.
    • Understand the importance of completing this activity for any kind of art project.
    • Recognize the significance of understanding their clients, targets, and partners to ensure success.
    Trainer preparation needs
    • understanding the participants’ profiles and preparing the activity accordingly
    • preparation of handouts – either by using the proosed ones or creating new ones
    Tips and Recommendations

    Based on the available time frame, it is possible to use Steps 2, 3, and 4 as separate activities. Depending on the size of the group, Step 1 can be carried out in smaller groups. Additionally, during Step 5, the trainer or facilitator can ask only a limited number of participants to present their persona. For the persona activity, the trainer may provide different handouts and encourage the use of visual skills by asking participants to draw the person.

    Step by step

      • Step 1: Introduction
        Facilitate a brainstorming session to discuss the participants’ experiences in selling or exhibiting art and the challenges they face. Encourage them to share how they find clients and how they work with their partners.

      • Step 2: Stakeholder Map
        Based on the discussion, provide each participant with a Stakeholder Map template.
        Instruct them to identify the different stakeholders/partners they are in contact with and classify them according to their characteristics such as public institutions, NGOs, art organizations, private companies, sponsors, and other artists. They should also indicate the level of collaboration they have with each of them by placing them closer or farther from the core of the map.

      • Step 3: Persona
        Introduce the Persona temmplate to the participants. Instruct them to imagine a specific person whom their artwork is intended for and describe this person using this method. Encourage them to draw the face=character of their persona as well on the template.

      • Step 4: Instruct participants to formulate a short text for a social media post or other media for inviting the person they described in Step 3 to visit their website or exhibition.

      • Step 5: Facilitate a plenary discussion where each participant will present their stakeholder map, persona, and the invitation text. Ask them to provide feedback to each other and engage in a constructive discussion.

    Duration
    1,5 hours
    min.
    Skills and Competencies
    social and psychologial skills, empathy, imagination, marketing skills, communication skills
    Tools
    • Stakholder map template
    • persona template
    • blank paper, pens and pecils available in the room
    Space and accessibility
    • The activity can be organised in any training spaces. A blank wall or canvas is needed to put the results on.
    • In case of Online course: a MIRO board needs to be open where people can put the results of their work.
    Participant profile

    Mapping clients and stakeholders needs to be realised according to participant orientation: market-oriented artists focus on expanding their market by understanding their clientele; non-profit artists emphasize stakeholder mapping and understanding project target groups.

    Category
    ,
    Keywords
    , , , , ,
  • Design Thinking/Empathy Mapping

    Learning objectives

    Particpants learn to map the needs of their clients or target groups by dialoguing with them, and to use the results of this activity in their work.

    Skills and Competencies

    Communication and listening, empathy, analysis, critical thinking, changing perspectives, design tinking

    Expected results/outcomes

    One empathy map/interviewed participant is created
    Participants will learn and understand the use of empathy mapping, and design thinking.

    Minimum duration

    3 hours

    References, useful websites

    References, useful websites

    , , , ,

    Type of Goal

    COMM (Engaging and understading communities – communication)

    Tips on participants profile

    The activitiy is designed for any social group. For artists it might be more difficult to identity their “target group” than it is for craftspeople. For this group, if needed, an initialy discussion about the importance of needs assessment and the ways how it can be used ican be included at the beginning of the activity.

    Space and accessibility

    A larger space for plenary discussions, and some more isolated corners or rooms for interviews are needed. The place’s sonorization needs to permit the audio reconrding.

    Trainer preparation needs

    • understanding the context and the specific skills of the participants
    • identifying an initial question to be used for the interviews relevant for their activities/interest
    • be patient and ready to listening to the issues of the participants, and flexible enough to find solutions

    Tools, materials and handouts needed

    • PPT presentation
    • empathy map templates
    • consent forms
    • blank papers
    • extra audio recording facilities (recorder of phone)
    Type of Goal
    COMM (Engaging and understading communities – communication)
    Learning objectives

    Particpants learn to map the needs of their clients or target groups by dialoguing with them, and to use the results of this activity in their work.

    Expected results/outcomes

    One empathy map/interviewed participant is created
    Participants will learn and understand the use of empathy mapping, and design thinking.

    Trainer preparation needs
    • understanding the context and the specific skills of the participants
    • identifying an initial question to be used for the interviews relevant for their activities/interest
    • be patient and ready to listening to the issues of the participants, and flexible enough to find solutions
    Tips and Recommendations

    Participants can also conduct empathy mapping in a real-world context by interviewing their clients, visitors to their exhibitions, etc. This activity can be integrated as a blended part of the training, which the participants can perform after the workshop. They can refer to the results during an additional online or offline meeting. The empathy mapping session can also be conducted online. In this case, the interviews are prepared and recorded in breakout rooms. The resulting empathy maps can be uploaded to a shared platform, such as MIRO.

    Step by step

    • Step 1: Introduction to Design Thinking and Empathy Mapping 
      Give a brief presentation on empathy mapping using the provided PowerPoint presentation. Explain the main activities, methodological and ethical details of empathy mapping, and show the main steps to be followed during the session, including the primary questions to be asked during the interviews. Initiate a discussion with the participants about the method and distribute handouts, including empathy maps, blank papers, and consent forms.
    • Step 2: Empathy Interviews 
      Participants work in groups of 3-4 and create the interviews. Each participant is interviewed by the others in the group: one person asks the questions, and the rest take notes.
    • Step 3: Filling the Empathy Maps 
      One empathy map is filled for each interview by the interviewers. Based on their notes, they will write in the map the main observations, feelings, thoughts and concrete actions of the intreviewee with regard to the initial question. The participants can also use visual elements such as drawings instead of textual ones.
    • Step 4: Presentation and Discussion 
      Each group presents their empathy maps and how they understood the use of this method. Initiate a closing discussion about the use of empathy mapping and design thinking in the overall process of creation.

    Duration
    3 hours
    min.
    Skills and Competencies
    Communication and listening, empathy, analysis, critical thinking, changing perspectives, design tinking
    Tools
    • PPT presentation
    • empathy map templates
    • consent forms
    • blank papers
    • extra audio recording facilities (recorder of phone)
    Space and accessibility

    A larger space for plenary discussions, and some more isolated corners or rooms for interviews are needed. The place’s sonorization needs to permit the audio reconrding.

    Participant profile

    The activitiy is designed for any social group. For artists it might be more difficult to identity their “target group” than it is for craftspeople. For this group, if needed, an initialy discussion about the importance of needs assessment and the ways how it can be used ican be included at the beginning of the activity.

    Category
    ,
    Keywords
    , , , ,

Online workshop

Coming Soon